Desal a “competitive advantage” for state

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Extreme dry weather conditions in the lower Guadalupe River Basin could result in a water level drop of up to four feet. To prevent saltwater intrusion from the Gulf of Mexico into the fresh water supply, Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority (GBRA) crews inflated fabridam bags at the saltwater barrier last week.

The barrier allows the upstream water level to pool to a desired operating level four feet above mean sea level, and it will remain in operation until river conditions improve.

In June, GBRA issued an RFQ for engineering firms interested in preparing a feasibility study for developing a new 25 MGD (94,625 m3/d) regional seawater desal plant in Texas. The project, which could also produce more than 500 MW of electrical generating capacity, would be delivered as a public-private partnership.

Last week James Murphy, GBRA’s executive manager of water resources, issued a treatise on desalination which said that the new water supply project was designed to secure Texas’ long-term competitive advantage over other states.

“This is a strategic idea that can easily gain the endorsement and support of the legislature, the TWDB and our citizens. It is something that can be used to build partnerships and implement life-changing projects to ensure the future economic prosperity and competitiveness of our state,” he said.

RFQ responses are due on 12 September. More information is available by contacting Murphy at jmurphy@gbra.org.

Volume 48
Issue 31
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